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Explore an underwater paradise

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Hike through forests and across hills

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Overview

Named as the number one Caribbean island by Tripadvisor in 2013, and featuring on Ethical Traveller’s Ethical Destinations list in 2012, Dominica offers so much more than most other islands in the region, yet remains unspoilt by the impacts of mass tourism. Why not join the lucky few and discover whatever appeals of the following:

Easily accessible rainforest. Secluded beaches. World Class diving and whale watching. The longest hiking trail and the only natural World Heritage site in the Caribbean. 170 species of birds (but no poisonous snakes or insects), natural thermal spas, 365 rivers, dramatic waterfalls, well preserved colonial architecture, and the last home of the indigenous Carib peoples. All of this and much more can be experienced while staying at Fort Young. 

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Pure Adventure
Diving & SnorkelingHikingGuided ToursWaterfallsAdventureFishingBird WatchingSea Turtle WatchingWhale Watching
Diving & Snorkeling

Considered one of the best places to dive in the world, Dominica has some truly remarkable dive spots to satisfy every standard of diver. From the magical volcanic bubbles at the shallow site affectionately known as Champagne to looming overhangs and coral gardens filled with giant multicoloured sponges and fans. There’s no better place to experience our underwater world than from the Fort Young’s own dive shop and jetty, from where you can step straight from the hotel to the boat, run by local dive operator Dive Dominica.
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Hiking

The easiest heritage tour on the island, and one of the most revealing, starts from your bedroom door. Join us on a walking tour of the hotel, and learn how the history of the island echoes through our walls. Or Maybe you fancy something more ambitious – whether it is over one hour around Roseau’s Victorian buildings and craft market or one week trekking the longest trail in the Caribbean - the Waitukubuli Trail, the Caribbean’s first long distance walking trail, whose 14 sections cover 115 miles of some of the best walking in the West Indies, crossing the island north to south through National Parks, forest reserves and coastline.

our concierge service and activity desk will be more than happy to arrange guided walks for you that are perfectly matched to your abilities and what you wish to see.

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Guided Tours

The easiest heritage tour on the island, and one of the most revealing, starts from your bedroom door. Join us on a walking tour of the hotel, and learn how the history of the island echoes through our walls. Or if you fancy something more ambitious – whether it is over one hour around Roseau’s Victorian buildings and craft market or one week trekking the longest trail in the Caribbean, our concierge service and activity desk will be more than happy to arrange guided walks for you that are perfectly matched to your abilities and what you wish to see.
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Waterfalls

Dominica is a land of waterfalls – with 365 rivers rushing down from our heights, there’s plenty of places for them to become cascades. You can hike / drive to several of them in a short trip from the Fort Young. Head to Trafalgar’s twin drops and take a dip in a hot pool while there; or clamber across rocks and through rainforest on a 45 minute hike to the dramatic Middleham Falls, which drops down 200ft from the looming cliffs above.
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Adventure

Adventurers have been drawn to Dominica for centuries – From Francis Drake to the makers of the hit movies Pirates of the Caribbean 2 and 3, who brought Johnny Depp and his crew to film here for several months in their hunt for the Dead Man’s Chest. We can’t promise that sort of pirate treasure, but the island is filled with natural bounties, whether you want to follow in Depp’s footsteps or go mountain biking, rock climbing, canyoning, tubing and much, much more.
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Fishing

With the seabed often dropping away into the deep just 15 minutes by boat from the shore, its easy to go deep sea fishing while in Dominica, and at the Fort Young your vessel will pick you up and drop you off from the jetty right next to Warners Bar. Our diverse fishing grounds are well stocked with all manner of big fish, such as bonito, dorado, mackerel, marlin, sailfish and tuna.
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Bird Watching

170+ species of bird can be seen on Dominica, making it a veritable birders paradise. We’ve two endemics, the Jaco parrot and our national bird, the magnificent Sisserou, the largest of all the Amazonian parrots, an endangered species once numbering in the millions but now down to just a few hundred individuals and found nowhere else in the world.

The island’s high forested peaks also make it a favourite stopping off place for migratory birds, and keen birders flock from around the world for the chance to see some of the many species that pass through, along with many of the other regional highlights such as Blue-headed Hummingbirds, Ruddy Quail-doves, Caribbean Elanias, Blue-headed Euphonia, Lesser Antillean Flycatchers, Pearly-eyed Thrashers and Scaly-naped Pigeons.

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Sea Turtle Watching

Three of the world’s seven species of sea turtle nest on Dominica’s shores, returning from journeys that span the world to our quiet, volcanic sand beaches. if the time is right we can arrange for you to be an exclusive and privileged guest at a couple of the most magical experiences imaginable, either witnessing them lay their eggs, or a few weeks later being there as the tiny hatchlings emerge from their shells and making their first brave dash across the sand for the waves.
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Whale Watching

Three of the world’s seven species of sea turtle nest on Dominica’s shores, returning from journeys that span the world to our quiet, volcanic sand beaches. if the time is right we can arrange for you to be an exclusive and privileged guest at a couple of the most magical experiences imaginable, either witnessing them lay their eggs, or a few weeks later being there as the tiny hatchlings emerge from their shells and making their first brave dash across the sand for the waves.
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101 Things To Do

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History and Culture

Despite Christopher Columbus arriving in Dominica in 1493, just a year after his first voyage to the New World, Dominica was the last of the Caribbean islands to be colonised by Europeans, around one hundred years later. Columbus did, however leave one lasting legacy – he named the island ‘Dominica’ after the Spanish word for Sunday, the day on which he first reached the island.

Before the Europeans, the island was inhabited by various peoples who came over from the American continent, of whom the best known were the Kalinago, whom the Europeans referred to as Caribs. With rather more appreciation of our island’s uniqueness than Columbus, they called it Waitukubuli – “tall is her body” – an elegant image of this mountainous and fertile land. Dominica is home to the last remaining community of Kalinago in the West Indies, a population of a little over 2,000 living in a 3,700 acre territory on the northwestern side of the island. set aside for them at the beginning of the last century. Anyone interested in discovering something of this less well known side of Caribbean history is recommended to visit the Kalinago Barana Auté, a representation of a pre-Columbian village.

Over the following centuries, Dominica was fought over continually by the English and French colonialists, being at one time or another controlled by either power. Eventually in 1838 the country became the first British Caribbean colony to have a legislature controlled by an African majority, although it was not until 1978 that it gained independence.

These many influences have enriched Dominica’s culture in diverse ways, from the many flavours of our creole-inspired cooking, to our own unique music form Candence-lypso, made famous by bands such as Exile One and celebrated each year along with many other forms of creole music at the World Creole Music Festival, taking place every October in Roseau. Spend a few days in Dominica at any time of year, and discover how the Nature Island is rich in history and culture too.

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Getting Here

Dominica is served by two airports: Melville Hall (DOM) and Canefield (DCF) Airport. Most visitors to Dominica will arrive through Melville Hall as it is the larger of the two airports and accommodates commercial airlines. Canefield Airport, 15 minutes from the capital city of Roseau, is only 3,100 ft long and currently serves primarily courier services. Melville Hall, located in the north-eastern side of the island, approximately one hour and 20 minutes from the city, features a longer runway and updated terminal.

International flights from US and Europe are connected to the island through hubs in Antigua (ANU), Barbados (BGI), St. Maarten (SXM), Puerto Rico (SJU), Guadeloupe (PTP), and Martinique (FDF). Leeward Island Air Transport (LIAT) offers direct connections from ANU, BGI, SXM, SJU, and PTP as well as other connecting flights across their 22 island network. BVI Airways provides service from St. Maarten and Tortola.

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Island Hopping
Dominica may have more variety to offer than most other Caribbean islands, but we’re also just an hour or so away by ferry from Guadeloupe, St Lucia and Martinique. The ferry terminal is no more than a one minute walk from the hotel, just a hundred metres further along the quay. Each day 300-seat and 400-seat catamarans ferry passengers back and forth between our island and our neighbours.

If you fancy a spot of island hopping, our concierge can arrange your tickets. You could have breakfast with us, lunch on another island, and be home in time for a sundowner on our terrace. Or if you want to take things a little slower, ask us about recommended hotels on the other islands so you can extend your stay with one of our neighbours for a little bit longer.

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